Lance Armstrong’s Fall From Grace

THE BIBLE WARNS AGAINST THE PRIDEFULNESS THAT LED TO ARMSTRONG’S COMEUPPANCE.

Seven-time Tour de France cycling champion Lance Armstrong has long rejected the idea that God has dominion over his life.

He has refused to accept that his Creator saved him from testicular cancer (“If there was a God, I’d still have two balls,” he once sneered).

He has refused to credit the Almighty for his exceptional athletic prowess (“One of the redeeming things about being an athlete is redefining what’s humanly possible,” he once declared.)

The Bible warns that “God opposes the proud.” And Armstrong’s stunning fall from grace offers proof that God’s Word does not return void.

The disgraced cyclist has lost almost everything that mattered to him.

This past summer, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency charged him with having used performance enhancing drugs, stripped him of all his cycling titles and banned him from every competing again.

Yesterday, Nike announced that it was severing its ties with Armstrong, going so far as to remove his name from its corporate fitness center (just as it removed the name of the late Joe Paterno from its corporate daycare center).

That prompted other Armstrong sponsors to follow suit, including Trek (which made Armstrong’s bicycles), Anheuser-Busch, 24 Hour Fitness, FRS and Honey Stinger to follow suit.

Then, perhaps, the biggest ignominy of all, the scandalized cyclist was forced to step down from his own Livestrong Foundation.

Were Armstrong a man of faith, now would be the time for him to drop down on his knees and humble himself before God; to ask the Lord to have mercy upon him, according to His loving kindness, and to blot out his transgressions.

But Armstrong believes he is master of his own fate. He doesn’t believe he is accountable to God.

“If,” wrote Armstrong, in his 2000 autobiography, “there was indeed a God at the end of my days, I hoped he didn’t say, ‘But you were never a Christian, so you’re going the other way from heaven.’ If so, I was going to reply, ‘You know what? You’re right. Fine.’”

That’s the kind of pridefulness God opposes.

It led to Armstrong’s fall from grace. And, unless he gets right with the Almighty, it will lead to his eternal damnation.

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